Inside Anglo American's Grosvenor Coal Mine near Moranbah. Picture: Youtube
Inside Anglo American's Grosvenor Coal Mine near Moranbah. Picture: Youtube

100 jobs to be cut at Central Queensland mine: Union

A HUNDRED coal jobs will be slashed at Anglo American's Grosvenor mine, according to a miners' union.

The CFMEU said it had been informed of the job cuts today, which comes after the shocking underground explosion at the site in May.

The entire production workforce at the Moranbah mine is supplied on a casual basis by labour hire company One Key.

CFMEU Mining and Energy Queensland president Stephen Smyth said all job cuts were a blow to workers and their families.

"All of us in the industry have been shaken by the terrible events of May 6 at Grosvenor mine," Mr Smyth said.

"Workers at Grosvenor have had to deal with the trauma of those events, an ongoing inquiry into what occurred and uncertainty over the future of their jobs.

"Today they've had the terrible news that 100 positions will be cut."

CFMEU Mining and Energy Queensland president Stephen Smyth. Picture: Daryl Wright
CFMEU Mining and Energy Queensland president Stephen Smyth. Picture: Daryl Wright

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An Anglo spokeswoman said the company had been reviewing its workforce plan.  

"As an initial step, over the last month One Key Resources has been seeking expressions of interest from the Grosvenor workforce for voluntary redundancies," she said.  

"While there has been some interest in voluntary redundancies, there are discussions occurring with workforce representatives about how additional reductions can be achieved.

"Over and above what is required in workforce agreements, Anglo American will be providing redundancy benefits to the eligible One Key workforce impacted by the workforce reductions."

The spokeswoman said Anglo had  "reluctantly" taken these steps to ensure that the mine could continue to support the majority of its remaining workforce, of around 650 people, and successfully return to safe production next year.

The company confirmed it would reduce its Grosvenor workforce by about 100 roles. 

Mr Smyth said most of the miners at Grosvenor had worked full-time at the site for years and were not genuine casuals.

He said despite their long employment at the site, the workers did not receive entitlements and job security.

"Even if Anglo steps up and pays redundancy for One Key labour hire casuals in these unfortunate circumstances, it reinforces the question of why they were casuals to start with," Mr Smyth said.

"There are very few genuinely casual jobs in coal production. These workers perform long shifts on long-term rosters.

"We need real change over employment practices in our industry."

The entry to Grosvenor Mine, near Moranbah. Picture: Daryl Wright
The entry to Grosvenor Mine, near Moranbah. Picture: Daryl Wright

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Five workers suffered horrific injuries during a methane blast at Grosvenor mine in May.

Operations are not expected to restart at the mine until the second half of next year.