FUTURE-PROOFING: Senator Fraser Anning and senior staff member, Leon Ashby were in Chinchilla over the weekend promoting their plan to drought-proof Queensland.
FUTURE-PROOFING: Senator Fraser Anning and senior staff member, Leon Ashby were in Chinchilla over the weekend promoting their plan to drought-proof Queensland. Kate McCormack

Anning brings drought-proofing plan to Chinchilla

SENATOR Fraser Anning visited Chinchilla over the weekend to reveal a multi- billion-dollar plan to drought-proof the state and better manage its water supply.

Senator Anning and senior staff member Leon Ashby revealed a $60 billion action plan to invest in Queensland's and Australia's future through developing the Bradfield Scheme as well as diverting the Walsh, Tate, Einasleigh and Gilbert rivers to Richmond and extending the Burdekin Dam wall.

"The plan is to nearly triple the size of the Bradfield Scheme and get water all the way down to Barcaldine, Richmond, Winton even down to Aramac. Through this we can water a huge amount of country and become the biggest food bowl in the world,” Mr Anning said.

"If north Queensland was a country, it would be the wettest country on earth.

"We can create enormous amounts of water at very reasonable prices for farmers because it's all gravity fed, and we will be able to capture a lot more water in times of flood,” he said.

Mr Anning predicts the project would initially create 4000 jobs and take 15 years to complete with the goal of drought- and flood-proofing Australia's cattle industry.

"Over the last month north Queensland farmers have lost between 300,000-550,000 cattle and that should never have happened. We could have kept most of that water in reservoirs or within the river banks,” he said.

Mr Anning also said small towns such as Dalby and Chinchilla would profit from the investment through the irrigation of crops as more people would be able to farm produce in the region.

"Most importantly these schemes would offer graziers drought-proof options by enabling them to grow their own fodder on a block of land with an irrigation licence, and store it against the next drought,” Mr Anning said.