LETS GO FLY A DROME: Engineering principles teacher Jason Duma and student Chris learn how to control a drone in STEM club.
LETS GO FLY A DROME: Engineering principles teacher Jason Duma and student Chris learn how to control a drone in STEM club. Contributed

Ideas STEM from new club at Miles State High School

FLYING drones and putting holes in a phone via the computer, aren't things you would usually see in the classroom but, with the addition of their new STEM club, Miles State High School students get to do those things plus many more.

For the past three weeks on a Friday afternoon, around 10 Years 7-10 students participate in the school's new STEM Club.

Aiming to enable students to participate in a few different skill-based learning opportunities, the idea is to see what interests them and give them an opportunity to develop that interest.

Miles State High STEM Club coordinator Caleb Kuhl said the club was just an advancement of what happened in the classrooms already.

"It's all about the students discovering what they want to be able to do, working out ways in which they can do that, putting that into practise and solving any problems that they may happen along the way,” he said.

"It's not just all about playing but it's important they are learning in the space.”

This term the students are focusing on the theory and practise of prototyping.

For one activity, instead of making an object straight away (which takes a lot of time), they built a model which they could modify exactly how they wanted to iron out the kinks.

One student was in the process of making a model cafe and was trying to discover, through making the model, which sized tables and chairs and what placement suited the space.

"They have also been learning computer prototyping and have made 3D (models),” Mr Kuhl said

"We then use our new 3D printers to print them.

"They have also been learning how to fly drones and control the airflow so it is able to fly.”

As part of the STEM club, the Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy will hold a Scratch Programming course on Wednesday.

Students from both Chinchilla and Miles state high schools will learn how to code computer games and will have to put on their critical-thinking caps firmly to come up with the best game.

School principal Josette Moffatt said students would be excited by the hands-on approach of the workshop to develop coding skills.

"These skills are imperative to 21st century learners and will open their minds to pathways in future STEM industries.”